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Eric Wind fires starting gun on vintage stopwatch collaboration with Tracksmith

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Vintage watch aficionado Eric Wind has created a special collection of 11 historic stopwatches that go on sale exclusively at sportswear specialist Tracksmith today, August 5.

Eric Wind.

The cross-over collaboration is said to be inspired by Mr Wind’s memories of the 1996 Olympic Games in Atlanta where Michael Johnson dominated the sprints in his golden running spikes.

The limited-edition Tracksmith x Wind Vintage Collection includes a selection of 11 vintage mechanical stopwatches.

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Each of them sold with a customized Wind Vintage x Tracksmith leather pouch.

Breitling ($290.00)

From the company’s earliest days, Breitling has been obsessed with tracking time, from chronographs to stopwatches. This stopwatch is stamped with No. 301, indicating the reference number and comes with its original box. It counts up to 60 seconds and 30 minutes. Watch experts could describe it as a “red-quarter dial” because the 15, 30, 45, and 60-second markers are in red while the rest are in black. Breitling made many stopwatches under the WAKMANN name and also under the Breitling name, many destined for the American market. This stopwatch is likely from the 1970s, was originally made in Switzerland, and has a diameter of approximately 51 millimeters.

Favre-Leuba ($190.00)

Favre-Leuba is a Swiss manufacturer that has long specialized in exporting to the Indian market. This stopwatch is in remarkably mint condition for its age and features its original blue box marked Bombay and Calcutta on the front.

It counts up to 30 seconds and 15 minutes, but the outer track allows for a counting of an additional 30 seconds for 60 seconds total. The back of the stopwatch suggests it might be a model with the reference 5119 and the 64th watch of that model made.

This stopwatch is likely from the 1950s, was originally made in Switzerland, and has a diameter of approximately 48 millimeters.

Gallet ($190.00)

Gallet has a long history of producing chronographs (watches with stopwatch complications incorporated in them) and timers including stopwatches with a primary emphasis on the American market. This stopwatch counts up to 60 seconds and 30 minutes. The 60 seconds and 30-minute numerals are both in red, which provides a pop of color against the bright-white dial. The case has a sandblasted finish. The watch is presented in mint condition. This stopwatch is likely from the 1970s, was originally made in Switzerland, and has a diameter of approximately 50 millimeters.

Heuer by Abercrombie & Fitch Split-Seconds ($590.00)

Heuer has had a long history of being one of the leading stopwatch manufacturers and even has served as an official timer for the Olympic Games. This is an early split-second stopwatch made by Heuer to be sold at Abercrombie & Fitch retailers in the United States (at a time when the brand sold outdoor gear). This stopwatch counts up to 30 seconds and 15 minutes, but the outer track allows for a counting of an additional 30 seconds for 60 seconds total. This rattrapante or “split-seconds” stopwatch can track two different runners crossing a finish line. The first second hand,which is closer to the dial, has a half-moon shaped counterweight, whereas the other second hand has a teardrop shape as its counterweight. This stopwatch is likely from the 1960s, was originally made in Switzerland, and has a diameter of approximately 57 millimeters.

Heuer Board of Education NYC ($290.00)

Heuer has  a long history of being one of the leading stopwatch manufacturers and even has served as an official timer for the Olympic Games. This stopwatch was ordered by the Board of Education of New York City from Heuer for use by teachers and coaches.

We presume that most were used by gym teachers for timing running and other activities in gym class. The case back engraving states “Bd. of Ed. / N.Y.C.” It counts up to 60 seconds and 30 minutes. Notice also the very austere look of the black numerals and text on the white dial. This stopwatch is likely from the 1960s, was originally made in Switzerland, and has a diameter of approximately 53 millimeters.

Heuer Clubmate ($390.00)

 

 

Heuer has  a long history of being one of the leading stopwatch manufacturers and even has served as an official timer for the Olympic Games. This Clubmate is a slightly unusual stopwatch, as this one winds on the case back instead of at the top.

One begins timing with the green button, stops the timing with the red button, and resets it with the black button. It counts up to 60 seconds and 60 minutes. This stopwatch is likely from the 1980s, was originally made in Switzerland, and has a diameter of approximately 59 millimeters.

Heuer Digital Hour Counter ($290.00)

Heuer has a long history of being one of the leading stopwatch manufacturers and even has served as an official timer for the Olympic Games.

This is a sophisticated and rare stopwatch as it has a jumping hour counter. This window allows for the tracking of hours, whereas most stopwatches from that time period only counted up to 30 minutes. This counts to 60 seconds, 60 minutes, and 12 hours. It also has the original red Heuer sticker on the case back. This stopwatch is likely from the 1970s, was originally made in Switzerland, and has a diameter of approximately 53 millimeters.

Heuer Supertrack ($290.00)

Heuer has  a long history of being one of the leading stopwatch manufacturers and even has served as an official timer for the Olympic Games.

This Heuer Super Track has a beautiful grey center to the dial. You begin timing with the green button, stop the timing with the red button, and reset it with the black button. It has been preserved in “like new” condition and comes with the original blue Heuer sticker on the back, the original box and guarantee booklet. This stopwatch is likely from the 1970s, was originally made in Switzerland, and has a diameter of approximately 53 millimeters.

Heuer US Government Trackmate ($250.00)

Heuer has had a long history of being one of the leading stopwatch manufacturers and even has served as an official timer for the Olympic Games.

This Heuer stopwatch was ordered by the US Government, as noted on the dial, and could have been used to time members of the American military among many other possible uses. It is notably part of the “Trackmate” line and we love the “60” seconds and “30” minutes in red on the dial. This stopwatch is likely from the 1970s, was originally made in Switzerland, and has a diameter of approximately 53 millimeters.

Minerva ($190.00)

Minerva was a leading Swiss watch and stopwatch manufacturer now owned by Montblanc. This stopwatch counts up to 60 seconds and 60 minutes. This is a patented model where the minute counter is an orange-red centrally located. The top button stops it and then a button located between 5 and 10 on the top right of the stopwatch resets the hands. We particularly like the open “6” in “60” and how “PATENT” is printed in a curved manner right below the center post of the dial. This stopwatch is likely from the 1960s, was originally made in Switzerland, and has a diameter of approximately 51 millimeters.

Omega ($290.00)

OMEGA is famous for its tool watches, most notably the Speedmaster chronograph that was worn by Apollo astronauts on the Moon, and has served as an official timer for the Olympic Games.

OMEGA also has a rich history of producing excellent stopwatches including for use in timing events at the Olympic Games and has been official timekeeper since 1932.

This watch has a hand-engraved “Miner 1958” on the case back, presumably the last name of the original owner. It counts up to 60 seconds and 30 minutes.

We particularly like the open “6” in 60 as well as the red “60” for the seconds and red “30” for the minutes. This stopwatch is likely from the 1950s, was originally made in Switzerland, and has a diameter of approximately 50 millimeters.

 

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